Big Disasters

When you think of disasters what do you think of?  Flood, massive power outage, fire, and pandemic are probably at the top of your list.  That’s ok, big disasters always grab the headlines.  In addition, there are all events that we can’t really control; the hurricanes are going to happen, the power does go out, fires happen sometimes due to human error, and health crises are still one of the large mysteries of life.  So for these events that may or may not happen, you understand the need to have a business continuity plan (BCP).  Since you’re reading this blog post, I assume you have such a BCP in place to keep your business working efficiently when “disaster” strikes.

Small Disasters

But what about small disasters?  Are they a lower risk to business’?  One that comes to mind and is in the news again – disrupted travel plans.  The impact from the April 13 eruption of a volcano on Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier was felt worldwide.  We all know someone, perhaps even you, who had to shuffle travel plans.  Or worse, were stranded in an airport with no chance of making it home or to that all-important business meeting.  For the first few days of airport closures, people were taking things in stride, you adjusted your meetings pushing them ahead a few days, convinced that you’d be on your way soon enough.

Then the delays continued.  Airports throughout Europe remain closed.  You or your business partners are trapped.  Slowly but surely, things are getting more stressful.  Meetings are canceled.  Potential business deals fall through.  There is only so much business you can conduct over Skype and with your laptop in an airport!

So after considering this, would you now add airport closures and flight delays to your list of disasters?  The impacts are pretty darn similar to a hurricane or fire.  You can’t travel, you’ve missed meetings, business deals are getting pushed aside, there is a slight level of chaos in you office.  All this to say that when you think about BCP you need to think beyond the big picture.  You need to really look at your business – how do you make your money?  What technologies (yes air travel is part of the technology sphere) do you rely on?  How are you going to keep running making money and closing deals when these technologies are impaired?

When it comes time to do your semi-annual analysis of your BCP strategy, be sure to remember April and May 2010.  The lessons learned during these two months can come in very handy when making adjustments to your plans and working with qualified BCP consultants to ensure that when disaster strikes, you’re ready.

About KingsBridge

KingsBridgeBCP offers businesses of all sizes BCP Software Solutions and industry know how based on best practices.  We help build, exercise, and maintain Business Continuity Plans. Our services and software packages are customized to meet the wide range of our customers’ needs, ensuring we deliver the best value in every project. To learn more click here or check out our Services.

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